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CSPAN
May 6, 2012 4:30pm EDT
bizarre. the story comes full circle in this essentially very small geographic area. you have brown at the kennedy farm invading harper's ferry in 1859. harper's ferry is a flash point and the civil war changes hands a dozen times. stonewall jackson takes harper's ferry a awe few days before, and that's why the battle happened. the union realizes lee has divided his army. they attack, and as a result of antetum, which is seven miles from the kennedy farm, lincoln issues the emancipation proclamation. so, you know, this incredible journey in our history all occurs in this very tight geographic area. i mean, it really is quite stunning. this is the irony while i was sort of bashing lincoln but suggesting that he wasn't the great emancipator initially that people imagined. he actually was on the conservative end of the anti-slavery spectrum, and this comes through again very much in his attitude towards brown, the great irony is that he eventually comes around to brown's position and that slavery -- this must become a war against slavery and ends up, you know, taking the south that beg
CSPAN
May 5, 2012 11:00am EDT
three times. and, of course, his newest "midnight rising," which is about john brown and the events that changed the course of american history forever. tony is also a pulitzer prizewinning journalist. he worked for many years for the "wall street journal" and "the new york times." but one of the things i want to tell you about tony is he really want to tell you he is a very, very dear friend. one of the things about tony is he really and truly has a notion that we at the journey like to say that we put people in the boots of those who went before us, in order for them to know, as david mccullough told us years ago, those people who lived long ago didn't know they were living long ago. tony one-ups it. because not only do our programs try to put students and visitors and teachers into the boots of those who went long ago, tony, as he writes here, wants to get not into their boots, but into their minds. and he's done that with every book he's written, and it transports us to times and places that really challenge us. so we're here today and we'll have a conversation, and then we're g
CSPAN
May 6, 2012 4:00pm EDT
rising" which is about john brown and events that changed the course of american history forever. he worked for many years for "the wall street journal" and "the new york times." he's a swre, very dear friend. one of the things i want to tell you about tony, he really and truly has a notion we like the say that we put people in the boots of those that went before us in order for them to know as david mccullough told us years ago, those people who lived long you a go didn't know they were living long ago. tony one-ups it. not only do our programs try to put students and visitors and teachers into the boots of those long ago, tony wants to get not into their boots but into their minds. and he has done that every book he has written. we are here today. a conversation and then we are going to open the floor to your questions to this amazing man. because you are our friend we can say you are an amazing man. >> they say you can't go home. lived here for 13 years and it still feels like home. there are five people in the audience i still don't know. good to be back. >> we are not very far f
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 10:30pm EDT
. making trips to chatham. often they will talk about whether they should have followed john brown. well, delany, or harriet tubman, or mary ann shadd-cary who had never done anything operationally that we know of. for them to say you should follow john brown is to say they should follow a captain. why did i say that? if you read frederick douglas, martin delany, mary ann shadd-cary. they refer to john brown as a captain. what does that mean? john brown wrote his own constitution. he viewed himself in that way as a general. captains don't lead generals. captains are tactical, not strategic. this organization already had a plan, it was to end slavery in league with the constitution, not write a new constitution. however they found -- they found tactical value in what john brown did. and anyone subordinate to the captain, they would encourage them to follow john brown. you have to be subordinate to the caption. it's a tactical operation. you don't send strategically important folk on a tactical operation that may be a suicide mission. they do view john brown as a martyr. in many ways it wa
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 7:00pm EDT
mentioned that john brown -- i know that several people -- i thought also mary ann chad carrie had supported him, but mammy pleasant also provided some funds. what other -- what role -- other roles did you see for her in this? >> well, first, it's logistical support. and so they provide them logistical support. they're looking to the grander plan. but as far as the officers and those in higher reasons delaney makes it very clear they're not going to support -- in the meeting with john brown. that's when john brown calls delaney a coward and delaney says, captain brown does not know the man of whom he speaks. there's no one in whose veins it flows less freely than me and it must not be said by anyone even john brown. with them, they provided logistical support for john brown and john brown had taken that on himself. so you would bring shields green, and others. you'd bring them in, they would work with him. but the organization itself like someone like mary ann shad carrie and the same with others in position they're in place to do something else in the strategic plan. >> but you do
CSPAN
May 21, 2012 11:00am EDT
ever sent him a text. >> did the relationship change at all when mr. brown became prime minister? because we know mr. brown was much closer to mr. dayko than was mr. blair closer to mr mr. dayko. >> yes, mr. dayko -- i think you'd find he was skeptical about mr. blair in a way that -- well, he was less skeptical about mr. brown. it did -- partly because mr. brown before he became leader had had conversations with mr. decker about heading up an inquiry into the 30-year rule. that in a sense was a done deal as i -- mr. brown became prime minister. but i then took on the operational side of that inquiry. and of course subsequently there were a lot of conversations with mr. decker and senior colleagues in the press about segment 55 of the protection act. >> we'll come to the detail. >> just before you go on, can i go back to a phrase i rather like, expectful acquaintanceship? was that because you or he felt that your respective paths took you into different directions and therefore that was the best way, or was it just that's -- it's just a coincidence and that's how it went and you
CSPAN
May 22, 2012 2:30am EDT
ever sent him a text. >> did the relationship change at all when mr. brown became prime minister? mr. brown was much closer to him than was mr. blair. >> yes, mr. daker was there to his, but you find that he was skeptical about mr. blair in a way that he was less skeptical about mr. brown. he did partly because mr. brown before he became leader with a view to becoming leader had had conversations with mr. daker about mr. daker heading up an inquiry into the third year rule. so i mean that in a sense was a done deal. as mr. brown became prime minister. i then took on the operational side of that inquiry. and, of course, subsequently there were conversations where mr. daker and other colleagues from the press about the data protection act increasing in sentences. >> we'll come to the details of that. before we go on, can i go back to a phrase i rather like, respectful acquaintanceship. was that because you or he felt that your respective paths took you in different directions and tlafr that was the best way, or was it it just that jurs a coincidence and you wouldn't have minded if it w
CSPAN
May 3, 2012 8:30pm EDT
as well. the music also had the power to achieve physical effects in the world. james brown was supposed to perform in boston, and his performance was in conjunction with the assassination of dr. king. there was violence all over the country in many cities. the city fathers of boston got together with james brown and decided to have the concert proceed and to broadcast it live on television, on public television, and so the concert went on and -- and it -- it succeeded in keeping the piece in boston, so we'll get a little flavor of his performance which i don't think is noteworthy except i can't help but think about his screams at this particular moment. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> okay. yeah, you could say he always screams like that, but at that moment it just seems to carry an additional level of meaning. aretha franklin was one of those artists whose songs were not always political, but this one she is making what i think is a feminist statement, and she actually is responding to james brown's song "this is a man's world," and she -- she's asserting women's right to respect and equality.
CSPAN
May 31, 2012 4:00am EDT
dependants in the south before the brown decision, and everybody who thinks that eisenhower was anti-brown really haven't done their homework, and you mentioned about my book. my book is not an opinion piece. there's not a phrase in it that's not rooted in a document or in compelling circumstantial evidence. that doesn't mean there isn't argument that can be had about motivation, but there's some things facts that aren't hidden hand facts as the phrase has become, supreme court appointments. eisenhower refused to appoint judges to federal courts who were known segregationists, refused to do that. john f. kennedy when he came in appointed those right and left, and i have to say to you, folks, i have a son named for jfk, if you want to know where i come from, okay? and, you know, it's going -- i have fun handing in the program, but, you know, facts are facts, so eisenhower did a lot. he didn't do some things that people would have liked to have seen him do, but we'll get back to little rock, because i don't want to preempt ernie talking about that, but little rock is the tip of the iceberg w
CSPAN
May 5, 2012 5:00pm EDT
press conference, and he came to embody what was known as secretary brown suggested as mcnamara's war. whatever the difficulties of the moment, he exuded a certainty that promised eventual success. in fact, we now know his public confidence far outlasted the emergence of profound private doubts about both the winnability of the war and indeed ultimately its purposes. and his departure from the pentagon in 1968, as much i think as lbj's march 31st speech of that year marked the glorious end of an era once bright with promise. as the war provoked increasingly nasty divisions in the united states, mcnamara became a target for critics from both left and right. unaware of his muted tightly constrained and largely internalized descent, doves viewed him as the technocrat as his blind faith in technology and statistics plunged the united states into a destructive quagmire. hawks, on the other hand, announced with growing venom his alleged refusal to give the military the freedom and the means to win a war, in their view, imminently winnable. in my experience, talking with veterans over the la
CSPAN
May 6, 2012 11:30pm EDT
the brown decision was made and early on, the 101st airborne division sent into little rock in 1957 was trained in riot control. this was not for riots in europe. they anticipated this, hoped not. one reason that brownell could persuade eisenhower to propose legislation was he convinced eisenhower it might be an alternative to using the one legal out that he had which was to use the troops, hoping not to do it. but he did. but little rock is the tip of the defense of brown iceberg, and i would point out to you that eisenhower could have chosen not to send troops. people assume he was forced to. >> yes. >> he was chose to, and he chose to very quickly, and he didn't craven around about it as much as some of the half informed commentaries say. the timeline was very shortstop as you mentioned, ernie, the faubus announced the national guard to -- to patrol the school on the night of september 2nd. they were there in the morning of september 3rd. on september 4th herbert brownell held a news conference and indicated specifically with the president's approval that one of the options of th
CSPAN
May 5, 2012 4:30pm EDT
harold brown and the author of mcnamara, clifford and the burdens of vietnam from 1965 to 1969. this is about an hour and a half. >>> for millions of americans, the veet ma'ietnam war was the g event in their lives whether they served in huge in vietnam or watched debate over the war at home. today it serves as a watershed period in history the same way world war ii did for previous generations. this panel this afternoon is of particular interest to me signs was a hospital corpsman stationed with the 1st marine division for six months in danang and then on the "uss sanctuary," served in tanang harbor for six months there. so it's my pleasure now to turn the program over to john hoffman, deputy chief historian at office of the secretary of defense, a retired marine colonel who is on active duty as infantry office and field historian for 17 years. in his civilian year, served in the history and museums division as chief of the army center for military history's contemporary studies branch and became deputy chief historian of the office in 2010. please welcome john hoffman. >> thank you
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 8:30pm EDT
brown, tony blair -- that the amount of time and energy that they, not just the people who work for them, but they as prime ministers have to devote and dedicate to kind of dealing with what are ultimately media management issues. it's grown. it's grown and it's growing because of the way the media has developed. i think that's a problem too. >> then you continue, they only have power if politicians let them have power. >> yeah. >> by which of course you mean it is within the gift of politicians to prevent press having power. but that might of course have obvious ramifications for free press. it also presupposes politicians are not going to yield to the obvious influences and powers which might intrude on their decision-making. would you agree with that? >> well, i think a lot of this started under margaret thatcher. i think that newspapers were given a sense of power. the numbers that we see, the peerages and the knighthoods and the sense they were almost part of her team. i think it changed under john major. i think when we were in power, i think that we -- i think we maybe did gi
CSPAN
May 30, 2012 9:30pm EDT
right. put the context for us. >> what was going on in the country? several things. first, the brown decision had been decided. it had been unevenly enforced. there had been the little rock crisis. but really, nobody knew whether and when or how school desegregation would really happen in the south. the justice department was trying to enforce existing civil rights laws, but there were holes in existing civil rights laws. it was mentioned earlier that under president eisenhower's watch, the 1957 civil rights act was enacted. the 1960 civil rights act that gave the justice department additional powers to enforce civil rights. but really still very, very significant constraints on what the justice department can do. the naacp is caught up with the struggle of trying to implement brown versus the board of education and then there was martin luther king who was catapulted to prominence with the montgomery busboy cot. in 1955 and 1956. but king is also looking in 1960, '61 for ways to push the movement forward. so what the context was a lot had been done. desegregation of the military, br
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 5:00pm EDT
his attorney general herbert brownell anticipated violence from almost the moment the brown decision was made and early on, the 101st airborne division sent into little rock in 1957 was trained in riot control. i would point out that eisenhower could have chosen not to send troops. people assumed he was forced to. he chose to. he chose to very quickly. he didn't quaver around about much of the commentaries say. the time line was very short. they announced the national guard on the morning of september 3rd. on september 4th herbert brownell held a news conference and indicated specifically with the president's approval that one of the options of the president could use was to use troops to enforce the supreme court decision. faubus sent a hot wire to eisenhower who was on vacation in newport, rhode island. eisenhower sent a telegram right back that was made public that said i will do whatever is necessary to upheld the constitution, they clear, now, they did meet and try to negotiate an arrangement on september 14th in newport, and that did not work out, and faubus did not keep his wo
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 11:00pm EDT
blair and brown left off. since we know what happened in may of 2010, do you agree with bi his view? >> he said there was no issue of principle and priority. i think there were issues of principle and priority, which i referred to a moment ago. but i do accept that part of the thinking of the prime minister and some of his colleagues was that to take on all of the press at a time when the public thought we got a pretty good deal was politically not very sensible. >> it might have been difficult to have approached this on a cross-party basis at any time between 1997 and certainly 2010 unless you are to identify the short window of opportunity which happened after the tragic death of princess diannandiana;t right? >> i think it would have been impossible to get that. >> what about the short window of opportunity? >> i'm not sure there was one. he was of the view the short window of opportunity was the same day that the bank of england gained independence right after the election, but i think that would have been difficult for obvious reasons. even all the focus there was on the media
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 10:30pm EDT
own vice president alexander stevens and the governor of the state, joseph brown, led the assault. still, georgia remained stalwartly for the president. as late as 1864 vice president stevens and governor brown could not turn the state legislature against davis. until the bitter end davis remained the dominant political force in the confederacy. finally, let's turn to davis as specific military commander in chief. davis never shunned his role as leaders of the confederate people and nations, as i tried to show. at the same time he took quite seriously his position as a military commander in chief as the head of the confederate armed forces. davis considered himself an expert in military matters and he believed himself eminently qualified to command an army or to command commanders of armies. he never doubted his own military ability or judgment. and directly the confederate war efforts, davis adopted hands-on tactics, his own predilection as well as his sense of duty involved in all aspects of confederate military from the trivial to the deadly serious. his administrative style da
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 2:30am EDT
the increasingly fractious relationship between mr. brown and mr. blair? >> i don't think so, no. in fact, i think she was -- i mean, it was a very difficult part of my job. the fact that the press were writing about the difficulties in that relationship all of the time and i was having to be out there as an advocate for the government, explaining what we were trying to, do focusing on the important things, so forth. no, i don't think she did. i think -- i knew she spoke to gordon and the people who worked for him and perhaps they sometimes said things to her that they wouldn't have said to us. >> was she increasingly seen as having influence over mr. murdoch? >> i think i -- my sense always was the most influential person in terms of influence upon murdoch was rupert murdoch. was she increasingly important in the organization? yes. >> were ministers afraid of her? >> i don't -- i'd say ththey sh have been. >> do you think they were? >> i don't think so. one of the reasons why, even though it's fairs to i think i'm somewhat png at national now, rebekah was always very, very straightf
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 6:30pm EDT
rosemary brown at a high school football game. they dated for two years and they were married in 1969 and leslie sabo was killed in 1970. leslie brown was visibly shaken as the president gave her the medal of honor. she says i know it won't bring back my husband, by my heart beats with pride for leslie. this is washington today on cspan radio. the fbi director telling a congressional committee today that authorities were investigating how information about an alleged plot by al qaeda to detonate a bomb on an airliner to the u.s. leaked to the news media. fbi director robert muller saying that the disclosure of the information about the plot that was first reported by the associated press on may 7 did compromise the u.s. operations against al qaeda. questions on all of this from senator john kyle, republican of arizona. >> let me also refer to your testimony about investigating the source of the leaks of this most recent, i these you referred eto it as an ied, but e can refer to it as another potential underwear bomber case, would that be accurate? >> explosive device. >> explosive dev
CSPAN
May 2, 2012 4:00pm EDT
populations, we're targeting a brown population. 43% of the undocumented population of the united states are overstayers of visas of one kind or another. that includes the little white irish nurse from the health care system in st. louis and she has a technical violation with immigration. well, that's all any of them are. so, you know, interior enforcement does not come anywhere near rivalling the frontier and border enforcement. so brown is involved in this equation. i'm sorry. there are other ways of dealing with it. my job is to question some of the assumptions. some of the assumptions are that we can prosecute this out of existence. that's your job. when janet napolitano was governor and when she was an attorney, same thing. she wanted to do that. that's not going to get it. my critique in my statement was enforcement only is not going to get it. there is the appropriate place for enforcement for prosecution, for all of those, for the distribution and the costs, et cetera. am i hopeful? i'm in the hope business. am i optimistic? i'm not anywhere near as optimistic as doug is.
CSPAN
May 31, 2012 7:30pm EDT
issue for black and brown voters and voter i.d. laws, we formed protecting our vote superpac. form and support your own institutions. and we have a history of doing this. black churches formed hbcus. out of hbcus. audioi'm an omega man. i see purple and gold sitting out on the table. i'm standing next to my delta sister, but i -- you must be an alpha. but we have a history of doing this. this is not new to us. but somehow we forgotten. we've forgotten how to take our political power and turn it into economic power that turns it into more political power that turns it into more economic power. we forgot how to support our institutions. but you know who hasn't? you know who we haven't learned from and they do this all the time? the pro-israel community. they are much smaller than us, but they have a much greater footprint. form and support your institutions. that's how you hold people accountable. power concedes nothing without demand. we begand nothin-- demand nothi get nothing. >> we cannot control the conversation unless we understand the issues. we cannot become politically sophistic
CSPAN
May 30, 2012 11:30pm EDT
for black civil rights in this country. and whether it is the brown berets or the young lords or in more establishment circles, henry gonzalez or ruben salazar, these men and women, cesar chavez, went to school on what black americans did, organizing with their bodies, with their lives, with their passion and understood that those struggles are never over, they understood it was going to be different because it manifests itself in a different way. and our history is different and the reasons we are here are different. but humanity is humanity and playing fair is playing fair. and those people, those men and women were going to do what was necessary to make america pay attention. i don't think they could have imagined in 1965 in school strikes and l.a. unified, in attempts to force integration and school lunches in phoenix and in the rio grande valley in texas. i don't think they could have imagined a country where in 2010 for the first time more children were born in this country who traced their ancestry to africa, latin america, and asia than to europe for the first time ever. tha
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 2:00am EDT
otherwise. then he said, david cameron took up by the time tony blair and gordon brown left off. ignoring what happened after may 2010, would you agree with mandelson's view, we simply chose to be coward? >> i agree with it to some extent. i mean, he said there were no -- there was no issue of principle or priority. i think there were issues of principle and priority which i referred to a moment ago. but i do accept that part of the thinking of the prime minister and some of his colleagues was that to take on the whole of the press at the time when most of the public thought we got a pretty good deal was politically not very sensible. >> it might have been difficult to have approached this on a cross-party basis at any time between 1997 and certainly 201. unless you were to identify a short window of opportunity which opened after the tragic death of princess diana. is that right? >> i think it would have been impossible to get a cross-party agreement on slide. >> what about that short window of opportunity? >> i'm not sure there really was one. i think that the -- i think inter
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 11:30am EDT
those amendments. this is played out in areas like affirmative action, race discrimination, so brown versus board of education and its progeny are the product of this. but it goes way beyond that. the number of different features of american law that are shaped and cannot be understood otherwise, except through these amendments, it knows no bounds. gun rights, your handgun rights which you now have, you didn't a couple of years ago but now you do, are run through the 14th amendments. there is no connecticut handgun second amendment right absent the 14th amendment, which has been inkormted by rights that were only before the civil war held by individuals as against the federal government. most criminal procedural law is the result of the 14th amendment. the list goes on and on. so this is a huge legacy of the civil war, one that's fought out all the time. just seven years ago -- nine years ago, justice o'connor, former justice o'connor said she hoped that maybe in about 25 years questions of affirmative action in higher education admission policies might be able to be race blind as a
CSPAN
May 11, 2012 5:30am EDT
the brown-kaufman act. i think there t will have traction on both sides of the aisle. senator shelby voted both against the bliely act and in favor of brown-kaufman when it was an amendment to the dodd-frank bill. thanks again to the witnesses. >> thank you, mr. claireman. and dr. vulkar, thank you for being here. enjoyed talking to you prior to. enjoyed reading your testimony yesterday evening as it came in. i think we all agree we need a safe banking system and we want one that also meets the needs of 21st century economy and that's the balance, i think, that we're all looking for. so i want it thank new particular in your testimony for pointing to the fact that congress still hasn't dealt with the gses. i know as a man wh was under extreme stress during early '80s and made a lot of tough decisions that caused you to be highly honored by people across this country, he must look at amazement on a u.s. congress that fails to deal with an evident, huge problem in our country. but has lacked the courage it deal with that. so i appreciate you pointing that out. and you know, i was think
CSPAN
May 18, 2012 11:00am EDT
the honorable sue eckert is a senior fellow at the thomas j. watson institute at brown university where her research is concentrated on making united nations sanctions more effective through targeting and combatting the financing of terrorism. strirt joining brown university, ms. eckert was employed at the institute of international economic, and from 1993 until 1997, ms. eckert was a
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 8:30am EDT
. several things. first the brown decision had been decided. it has been unevenly enforced. the little rock crisis. really nobody knew whether or when or how school desegregation would happen in the south. the justice department was trying to force existing civil rights laws, but there were holes in the existing civil rights laws. it was mentioned earlier that under eisenhower's watch, the civil rights act was enacted. it gave the justice department additional powers to enforce civil rights. still very, very significant con strands on what the justice department can do. the naacp is caught up with the brown v. board of education. then there is martin luther king. he was catapulted in 1965. king is also looking in 1960 and '61 for ways to push the movement forward. desegregation of the military, brown v. board of education, president kennedy and robert kennedy were racial liberals. they were comfortable with social equality. they were comfortable around african-americans. which distinguished them from most of the predecessors in the office of the presidency, but still nobody knew what t
CSPAN
May 6, 2012 8:30pm EDT
i remember that when the brown decision was handed down. i didn't, you know, i didn't know the nuances of the decision. i only knew the next morning in our local newspaper. it said that this court decision was going to change the face of the south, and i said good. the south that i saw at that time as a 13, 12, 13-year-old it was something, segregated fountains, buses, limited jobs, all of that. we didn't get our street paved until i think -- until the supreme court decision was handed down. there were no more new school buildings built for black folks after may 17th, 1954 than any time in the history of the country. all of that, you know, is what you're processing, so the way that little rock was a series, was a challenge from the state naacp daisy bates, and there's a documentary that i think public television has been doing on mrs. bates, but the moment came that i had a chance to say that i wanted to transfer. i wanted to transfer because you saw this huge building. you passed it every day. you knew that i came out of a family of teachers, and they always complained about t
CSPAN
May 21, 2012 9:30am EDT
and i think this goes for david cameron, gordon brown, tony blair. the amount of time and that they have to deal and delegate with the media management issue, it grown because of the way the media has developed. >> and you continue they only have power if politics let them have power, by which of course you mean it is within the gift of politicians to prevent the pressing is power. >> it presupposes they are not going to yield to the obvious influentials and powers that might intrude on their decision making. would you agree with that in. >> i think a lot of this is under margaret thatcher because i think that newspapers were given a sense of power, the numbers that received the knight hoods and the sense that they were almost part of her team. i think it changed under john major and i think when we were in power, i think we maybe did give the media too much of a sense of their own place within the political fervor and we should have changed it more. >> when you're talking about conferment of power, one of the virtues identified is the freedom of press. and the bad reasons, and you
CSPAN
May 2, 2012 5:00am EDT
blue eyes were superior to everybody else. and the photographs and portraits suggest he had brown eyes. this man has got lots of pathologies going on. pro slavery figures in america zero in on parts of his argument, and they use it in the u.s. and they say well, you know, the french have seen the light here and mr. gobineau has proven what we've already been saying. of course there is no proof. this is just a bitter angry man who is full of all of this prejudice, just writing books that confirm what he already thinks. he reaches a big audience of gobineau societies were founded in parts of europe. and unfortunately, he reaches a big audience in germany and one of the people he has an impact on was none other than right, adolf hitler. hitler himself read gobineau's publications and agreed with them. he has a big impact on the debate in the u.s. before the american civil war. now, not all white southerners are pro slavery. we must always bear that in mind. there are always some dissenters within. there are people who become abolitionists like cassius clay who stays in the south unti
CSPAN
May 30, 2012 10:00pm EDT
was gradualists. important, because they were winning cases like the 1954 brown decision. but that was a slow process. these young people were saying, we've got to move faster. the 1954 supreme court decision said we're all separate and equal, with all deliberate speed. when i applied to university of georgia in 1959, that was four years later, there was no deliberate to speed. these young people were saying, the time is now. martin luther king said the time is right to do right. and so they forced even king to be more militant. when king got arrested in atlanta, protesting with the students, it was -- he didn't plan to get arrested. but he did. >> the black people in atlanta didn't expect it either. >> but there were a lot of black older people. and you had these schisms. because you had courageous black people ho had been fighting for generations for equality. but you also had those who had been tormented and beaten and killed and all kinds of -- when they looked for goodman, chaney and schwerner and found them some 40 days later in the river, in the process they found so many other
CSPAN
May 31, 2012 2:00pm EDT
. not yet. [ applause ] we'll be closer to fulfilling that dream when more black and brown children enter kindergarten ready to read. we will have arrived when more children have fathers actively engaged in their lives when more black ben by their mid-30s have college degrees and not criminal records. [ applause ] we will have arrived when our schools are less segregated and less isolated racially when dr. king was assassinated instead of more selling gra gated as they are in fact today. and we will have arrived when an innocent black teenager in a hoodie is not somehow a criminal suspect. [ applause ] the truth is that in the years ahead, america will desperately need your leadership. there are so many battles that you must help fight, and to make sure we win. the poll tests and lit really tests once used to bar blacks from voting, those may be gone, but just since the beginning of 2011, in this past year, 17 states, one therpd of our nation, have passed laws that restrict the right to vote. most of these new laws require citizens to show a government issued photo i.d. before being
CSPAN
May 6, 2012 8:30am EDT
desection regait public schools to comply with the historic 1954 supreme court decision in brown versus the topeka board of education. these struggles for civil rights has not been easy. when they occur, they often revolve around the constitution with the rights that define us, as a nation have always been secured. first ten amendments to the constitution are known as the bill of rights. spell out personal rights and freedoms that are guaranteed to every american, including freedom of speech, religion and the press. right to petition the government, right to bear arms and the right to due process of law. most of the later amendments sought to explicitly extend rights, granted in the constitution itself to individual who's had been excluded from full participation in our democracy when the constitution was adopted in 1787. three post civil war amendments abolished slavery, made former slaves u.s. citizens and granted them the right to vote. the 19th amendment grant women the right to vote and another grant access to the ballot by 18-year-olds. we may view founding documents as tim
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 4:00pm EDT
, mark battaglini and tom lyons. thank you to senator scott brown who was here earlier but had to go. he's got a full schedule tonight. he was able to meet the veterans and greet them. some other people, george luz junior, his dad was featured in "band of brothers." george is my omar bradley. while i'm sitting there like eisenhower -- i don't smoke. if i did smoke, george is the guy who calms me down and tells me, everything is going to be okay. i'll take care of the little details. you need little details in operation over lord and other things, the invasion of normandy. lou ledoux from ac bats donated the bats outside that we're selling tonight. we've really benefited from his involvement. he's a board member of the foundation. we have some silent auction items. all the items out there raise money for the foundation and its mission so we can go to places like guadalcanal and normandy and take these veterans back. there's no more incredible experience than walking the battlefield in belgium or normandy with a veteran and their vivid recollection, any veteran knows they can recall pr
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 10:30pm EDT
communities of the coming of freedom. >> the airport was swarming with white, black, brown, indian, every hue of skin. i don't think i had ever seen i anything like that in my life. so that very first night we began to get an inkling of what this visit was going to entail. >> the speech robert kennedy gave on that occasion was certainly the most important speech of his life, and i think it captured the essence of what he stood for and came to be known for when he ran for president, particularly that one paragraph about the ripple of hope, which has been quoted over and over and over again. >> each time a man stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance. >> at the end of that speech i remember as if he stopped and looked around as if to say, was that enough? >> thank you. charlayne, you live in south africa now and have se
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 12:00pm EDT
. that's what i have asked the training commander and major general bob brown to start taking a look at this and provide us recommendations how we might move forward. there has been no decisions made. we want to bring information up to the secretary and decide the way forward on how we want to progress and potentially open it up to these positions. >> does that depend on how you see things go over the next several months with what is happening now? >> it's not going to wait -- start looking at it now. and then we will chart a course of action as a way forward. and i suspect something like that will probably come out sometime this summer. >> does this include a plan to send women through the marine equivalent of their infantry officer school? >> we have our own schools. we'll take a look at it. that's what the recommendation will come forward. are we going to do something like that senate that is part of what the recommendations are. we'll make some announcement on that later as we had a chance to look at it. >> the house opposition that has the floor today i wonder if you can comment
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